Lunar Eclipse Preview 2011 – 2030

Total Lunar Eclipse of 2000 Jan 20-21Beginning (right), middle (center) and end (left) of totality

An eclipse of the Moon (or lunar eclipse) canonlyoccur at Full Moon, and only if the Moon passes through some portion of the Earths shadow. The shadow is actually composed of two cone-shaped components, one nested inside the other. The outer or penumbral shadow is a zone where the Earth blocks part but not all of the Suns rays from reaching the Moon. In contrast, the inner or umbral shadow is a region where the Earth blocksalldirect sunlight from reaching the Moon.

There are three types of lunar eclipses:

– The Moon passes through Earths penumbral shadow. These pale eclipses are faint and hard to see.

– A portion of the Moon passes through Earths umbral shadow. These are easy to see with the unaided eye.

– The entire Moon passes through Earths umbral shadow. The Moon can turn orange, red or dark brown.

When an eclipse of the Moon takes place, everyone on the night side of Earth can see it. About 35% of all eclipses are of the penumbral type which are very difficult to detect, even with a telescope. Another 30% are partial eclipses which are easy to see with the unaided eye. The final 35% or so are total eclipses, and these are quite extrordinary events to behold.

For a complete introduction to this subject, see:Lunar Eclipses For Beginners.

Total Lunar Eclipse of 2004 Oct 27-28Beginning (right), middle (center) and end (left) of totality

Penumbral eclipses are of little interest because they are hard to see. If we consider only partial and total lunar eclipses, how often do they occur? The number of lunar eclipses in a single year can range from 0 to 3. The last time that 3totallunar eclipses occurred in one calendar year was in 1982. Partial eclipses slightly outnumber total eclipses by 7 to 6.

The table below lists every lunar eclipse (including penumbral) from 2011 through 2030. Click on the eclipseDateto see a map and diagram of an eclipse. The second columnTD of Greatest Eclipseis the Terrestrial Dynamical Time of greatest eclipse. TheUmbral Magnitudeis the fraction on the Moons diameter immersed in the umbra at maximum eclipse. For magnitudes greater than 1.0, the eclipse is total. For negative values, it is a penumbral eclipse. TheEclipse Durationis the duration of the partial phases as well as the total phase (in bold; total eclipses only). TheGeographic Region of Eclipse Visibilityoffers a brief description of where an eclipse can be seen. Although penumbral lunar eclipses are included in this list, they are usually hard to see because they are faint.

Geographic Region of Eclipse Visibility

S.America, Europe, Africa, Asia, Aus.

Europe, e Africa, Asia, Aus., Pacific, N.A.

Europe, e Africa, Asia, Aus., Pacific, N.A.

e Pacific, Americas, Europe, Africa, w Asia

Europe, Africa, Asia, Aus., w Pacific

S.America, Europe, Africa, Asia, Aus.

c Pacific, Americas, Europe, Africa

S.America, Europe, Africa, Asia, Aus.

e Asia, Australia, Pacific, Americas

Americas, n Europe, e Asia, Australia, Pacific

e Americas, Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia

Pacific, Americas, w Europe, w Africa

e Asia, Australia, Pacific, Americas

e Pacific, Americas, Europe, Africa

Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia, Pacific

Geographic abbreviations (used above): n = north, s = south, e = east, w = west, c = central

SeeLunar Eclipses For Beginnersto learn the basics.

Recent total lunar eclipses visible from the U.S.A. include the eclipses onAug. 28, 2007Feb. 21, 2008Dec. 21, 2010Apr. 15, 2014andOct. 08, 2014.

Upcoming lunar eclipses visible from the U.S.A. includeApr. 04, 2015andSep. 28, 2015.

Table and Diagrams of Lunar Eclipses: 2011-2020

Table and Diagrams of Lunar Eclipses: 2021-2030

Table and Diagrams of Lunar Eclipses: 2031-2040

Six Millennium Catalog of Lunar Eclipses: 3000 BCE to AD 3000 CE

Lunar Eclipses of Historical Interest

Shadow Diameters and Lunar Eclipses

Danjon Brightness of Lunar Eclipses

for Solar and Lunar Eclipse Predictions.